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Google adding DNSSEC to Cloud DNS service

Google just announced that it is adding DNSSEC (Domain Name Security Extensions) support to its fully managed Google Cloud DNS service. The new feature is currently in the beta testing phase. Basically, it offers the protection provided by DNSSEC without having to maintain it once it’s set up.

Google is currently offering instructions for signing up, along with tutorials and added resources for those who want to get started with the new feature now that it’s in the beta phase. Here’s some more information about what DNSSEC for Google Cloud DNS could mean for enterprise users.

What is DNSSEC?

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DNSSEC basically is a set of online specifications aimed at securing online information against certain types of cyberattacks like DNS hijacking and man-in-the-middle attacks. It works by cryptographically signing DNS records, preventing attackers from issuing fake DNS responses that could misdirect visitors to nefarious websites.

It is an important part of the Domain Name System. But until this recent update, it required a lot of work and maintenance for organizations and website operators to reap all of those security benefits within Google’s Cloud DNS or other DNS solutions.

DNSSEC and DNS

Google’s Cloud DNS is a Domain Name System that powers millions of domains online. So with DNSSEC in Cloud DNS, domain owners that use the tool can easily protect their domains against DNS hijacking and man-in-the-middle attacks with DNSSEC.

You can take advantage of the easy management options to basically enjoy the security features without having to provide extra maintenance once it’s set up. Or you can take a more hands-on approach if you so choose. For example, advanced users can choose to change up signing algorithms and denial-of-existence types. And Google also supports several different sizes of RSA and ECDSA keys. And it also includes support for both NSEC and NSEC3. This new support for DNSSEC brings no additional charges or changes to the terms of service, so you can still enjoy the same basic offering, just with an added element of security.

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