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Major innovations in Intel quantum computing unveiled

At the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Intel announced that it’s reached two major quantum and neuromorphic computing milestones. Though early in the development of these types of technology, the innovations could potentially lead to major changes for enterprises and others in the tech world down the line. Here’s more about the new Intel quantum computing innovations and what they might mean for the future of tech.

Intel quantum computing

Part of Intel’s breakthrough with quantum computing is a new 49-qubit superconducting quantum test chip that it’s calling Tangle Lake. This new chip is part of Intel’s goal of developing a complete quantum computing system, including architecture, algorithms, and control electronics. Tangle Lake is an important milestone because can make it easier for researchers to correct errors and simulate computational problems.

Eventually, the goal would be to use quantum computing to help people quickly solve problems that today might take the most powerful supercomputers months or years to resolve. These issues might include things like drug development, financial modeling, and climate forecasting. But this is just the potential of this type of computing. Right now, it’s still in the very early stages, so you shouldn’t expect to see this type of innovation making a major impact right away.

Intel neuromorphic computing

Intel

Intel has also been researching neuromorphic computing, which focuses on computing that mimics brain activity. This research has led to the development of Loihi, a neuromorphic research chip that includes digital circuits to mimic the brain’s basic operation. The chip combines training and inference with the goal of making machine learning more power efficient.

This is another early innovation. But eventually, this type of chip could be used to process real-world data in evolving real-time environments, like enabling smarter security cameras and smart-city infrastructure to work in tandem with autonomous vehicles.

Photo credit: Intel