Windows Server

NAT in Windows 2003: Setup and Configuration

This article will describe how to setup and configure NAT in Windows 2003. NAT, or Network Address Translation, is a widely used IP translation and mapping protocol that works on the network layer (level 3) of the OSI model. It is sometimes referred to as a routing protocol because of the way it allows packets from a private network to be routed to the Internet.

DNS Stub Zones in Windows Server 2003

We would like to extend a warm welcome to Microsoft expert Mitch Tulloch as he presents his first article to the WindowsNetworking.com community. In this article we'll learn about stub zones, a new feature of DNS in Windows Server 2003. Stub zones can help reduce the amount of DNS traffic on your network by streamlining name resolution and zone replication. We'll examine how stub zones work, when you would use them, and how to set them up in this tutorial.

Setting up & managing a file server in Windows 2003

A file server is a computer responsible for the storage and management of data in a central location. Network clients can access these files, therefore saving them from having to physically transfer data from one computer to another. Users are able to access files and applications at the same time. This will serve as a step-by-step guide on how to setup a file server in Windows 2003.

Setting up a DHCP server in Windows 2003

Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) is an IP standard designed to reduce the complexity of administering IP address configurations. – Microsoft's definition. A DHCP server would be set up with the appropriate settings for a given network. Such settings would include a set of fundamental parameters such as the gateway, DNS, subnet masks, and a range of IP addresses. Using DHCP on a network means administrators don't need to configure these settings individually for each client on the network. The DHCP would automatically distribute them to the clients itself.

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